July 04, 2019

Did you know that the forefather of fountain pen had a special participation at the American Independence Day?

July 4th, 1776, is a date that changed the world; a day that declared the birth of a great nation and enshrined the rights of a free and independent people. On that day, Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence and announced that the thirteen American colonies were independent states and thus, no longer part of the British Empire. The declaration famously made a statement of individual human rights:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, which among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

This famous statement now represents for many a moral standard for which the United States strives to uphold.

Did you also know that this document – the American Declaration of Independence – was written with a quill pen? Many other important documents were written and signed with quills. Another example is the Magna Carta. 

Then U.S. President Thomas Jefferson bred geese, especially at Monticello to supply his tremendous need for quills. So if you are holding a fountain pen right now, you can go down memory lane and relive that momentous event of U.S.A.

Celebrating the Independence Day

Many would celebrate the Independence Day with a parade or a barbeque or a picnic and a lot of times, with fireworks.

How about celebrating it this year with a different activity?

Since we mentioned the role of pens during the Declaration of Independence of the U.S., why not commence some writing activities that will still spark the excitement.

I know you see writing as a boring way to spend a very special holiday but sneaking some learning into the mix isn’t a bad idea at all. Besides, these 4th of July activities are fun and of course, educational!

So hold your favorite Dryden Designs fountain pen and choose one or two of these writing prompts on your Independence Day celebration with your family, clan or with your friends:

  1. My Freedoms

What does freedom mean to you? List five ways you can exercise your freedom.

  1. Parade Float

You have been invited to design a float for the 4th of July parade. In one word, what will be the theme of your float? Explain how you will express this theme through decorations, costumes, and music.

  1. Word Bank Story

Write a story using words from this Independence Day word bank.

  1. Message in the Sky

Imagine watching a fireworks show with your family. In a burst of red, white, and blue, an urgent message suddenly appears in the night sky. What does it say? What will you do?

  1. Story Fun

Write a story using these words: watermelon, fireworks, parade, thunderstorm, splash, race, tunnel, cousins, bicycle, dog. (Let younger children choose just 3-5 of these words for their story.)

  1. Mouthwatering Menu

Plan the perfect 4th of July barbecue or picnic. Make a list of foods you would serve. Then, choose one or two and describe them in detail to make them sound as tempting and mouth-watering as possible.

  1. It’s Been One of Those Days

Imagine a 4th of July celebration that is filled with mishaps. Write a story that tells about three things that go wrong.

  1. Dear Pen Pal

Write a letter to an imaginary friend who lives in another country. Explain why we celebrate Independence Day, and describe five things you like about living in America.

  1. It’s a Tradition!

Write about your family’s 4th of July traditions. Where do you go? What activities do you do? What foods do you enjoy?

  1. Holiday Acrostic

Create an acrostic:

Vertically on your paper, write either “INDEPENDENCE DAY” or “FOURTH OF JULY.”

Next to each letter, write a word, phrase, or sentence related to the holiday’s history or your family traditions. (For example, “J” could be Jefferson, Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, or Juicy watermelon.)

Then let us know how your 4th of July was with these activities.


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